Florida Window Tinting Laws – 2024 New Car Tint Laws in Florida

Car window tinting is a popular way to enhance privacy, reduce glare, and protect against harmful UV rays while driving in the Sunshine State. However, Florida, like many other states, has specific laws and regulations regarding window tint darkness and reflectivity. It is essential for vehicle owners in Florida to be aware of these laws to avoid potential fines and penalties.

When Were Florida’s Window Tinting Laws Enacted?

Florida’s window tinting laws were enacted in 1991. These laws were put in place to maintain visibility and safety on the roads while allowing a reasonable level of tinting for various purposes.

Florida Window Tint Darkness Limits:

The darkness of window tint is measured by Visible Light Transmission (VLT), which indicates the percentage of visible light that can pass through the window film and glass. In Florida, the permissible window tint darkness levels vary for different windows of the vehicle.

For sedans:

  • Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed along the top portion of the windshield, extending no more than 6 inches from the top.
  • Front Side windows: Must allow more than 28% of light in.
  • Back Side windows: Must allow more than 15% of light in.
  • Rear Window: Must allow more than 15% of light in.

For SUVs and vans:

  • Windshield: Non-reflective tint is allowed along the top portion of the windshield, extending no more than 6 inches from the top.
  • Front Side windows: Must allow more than 28% of light in.
  • Back Side windows: Must allow more than 6% of light in.
  • Rear Window: Must allow more than 6% of light in.

Window Tint Reflectivity in Florida:

Window tint can also have reflective properties, reducing glare and heat. In Florida, the window tint reflection is regulated as follows:

  • Front Side windows: Must not be more than 25% reflective.
  • Back Side windows: Must not be more than 55% reflective.

Other Florida Window Tint Rules and Regulations:

In addition to the darkness and reflectivity requirements, Florida has other important rules and regulations regarding window tinting, including:

In Florida, there are specific regulations regarding window tinting for vehicles:

  1. Side Mirrors: If any back windows are tinted, dual side mirrors are required.
  2. Restricted Colors: Florida does not permit any colored tint. Only standard window tint colors are allowed.
  3. Certificates: Film manufacturers are not required to certify the window tint film they sell in the state of Florida.
  4. Stickers: The sticker to identify legal tinting is required on the inside of the driver’s side door jamb. This sticker serves as proof that the window tint is compliant with Florida’s tinting laws.
  5. Medical Exceptions: Florida allows medical exemptions for special tint. Individuals with specific medical conditions that require additional protection from the sun’s rays or glare can obtain a Medical Exemption Certificate from a licensed medical practitioner. This exemption permits the use of darker window tints than what is typically allowed by state law.

As with any state regulations, window tint laws can change over time. It is crucial to stay informed and up-to-date with the latest information from the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles or other official sources to ensure compliance with the current window tinting laws in the state.

Penalties for Violating Window Tinting Laws in Florida:

Failure to comply with Florida’s window tinting laws can result in penalties and fines. The penalties may vary depending on the severity of the violation and the number of previous offenses. In some cases, vehicle owners may be required to remove the illegal tint and restore their windows to comply with state regulations.

How Do You File for a Window Tint Medical Exemption in Florida?

To file for a window tint medical exemption in Florida, you need to follow these steps:

  • Obtain a Medical Exemption Certificate (Form HSMV 83043) from your doctor or a qualified medical professional.
  • Complete the form with accurate information about your medical condition that requires window tinting for sun protection or health reasons.
  • Make sure the form is signed and dated by your doctor or medical professional.
  • Submit the completed Medical Exemption Certificate to your local Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) office.
  • Medical Exemptions for Window Tint Rules in Florida

Florida allows medical exemptions for window tinting if an individual has a medical condition that requires protection from the sun’s rays or excessive glare. The exemption allows for darker window tints than what is typically permitted by the state law. To qualify for a medical exemption, you must obtain a Medical Exemption Certificate from a licensed medical practitioner and submit it to the DHSMV.

Legal Window Tint Certificates in Florida

Florida does not require film manufacturers to certify the window tint film they sell in the state. However, if you receive a medical exemption, you need to carry the Medical Exemption Certificate issued by a licensed medical professional while driving.

What Does VLT Mean According to Florida State Law?

VLT stands for “Visible Light Transmission.” According to Florida state law, VLT refers to the percentage of visible light that is allowed to pass through the window tint film and the car’s glass. For example, if a window tint film has a VLT rating of 20%, it means the film allows 20% of visible light to pass through, and it blocks 80% of light.

Final Thoughts:

As a vehicle owner in Florida, understanding the state’s window tinting laws is crucial to ensure compliance and avoid potential legal consequences. Always verify the darkness and reflectivity levels of your window tint with reputable professionals to ensure your vehicle meets the state’s guidelines while enjoying the benefits of window tinting.

FAQ About Florida Window Tinting Laws

Is 35 Percent Tint Legal in Florida?

No, 35 percent tint is not legal for front side windows in Florida. Front side windows must allow more than 28 percent of light in.

Is 30 Tint Legal in Florida?

No, 30 percent tint is not legal for front side windows in Florida. Front side windows must allow more than 28 percent of light in.

Is 20% Tint Legal in Florida?

Yes, 20 percent tint is legal for back side windows and the rear window in Florida.

Is 15 Percent Tint Legal in Florida?

Yes, 15 percent tint is legal for back side windows and the rear window in Florida.

Is 5% Tint Legal in Florida?

No, 5 percent tint is not legal for any windows in Florida. The front side windows must allow more than 28 percent of light in, and back side windows and the rear window must allow more than 15 percent of light in.

Where Can You Download Florida Window Tint Exemption Form?

You can download the Florida window tint exemption form from the website of the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (DHSMV) or obtain it from a local DHSMV office.

Does Car Insurance Cover Tinted Windows in Florida?

Car insurance typically does not cover the cost of tinted windows unless they were included in the original manufacturer’s design or if the tinting is required for medical reasons with proper documentation.

Can You Get a Window Tint Ticket Dismissed in Florida?

The possibility of getting a window tint ticket dismissed in Florida depends on the circumstances and the discretion of the court. If you have a valid medical exemption or can demonstrate that the tint complies with the state law, you may have a chance to get the ticket dismissed.

Is Windshield Tint Legal in Florida?

Non-reflective tint is allowed along the top portion of the windshield, extending no more than 6 inches from the top. Windshield tint is not allowed below this specified line.

Is Ceramic Tint Legal in Florida?

Yes, ceramic tint is legal in Florida as long as it complies with the state’s darkness and reflectivity requirements for each window.

How Much Does a Florida Window Tint Ticket Cost?

The cost of a Florida window tint ticket can vary depending on the county and the specific violation. Penalties can range from $28.75 to $100 or more for subsequent offenses.

Please note that window tint laws and regulations may be subject to change, so it is essential to verify the latest information with the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles or consult a reputable window tinting professional.

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